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From Sifu Chuck’s Revolution Wing Chun FaceBook Page:

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Old school Judo.

The history of judo is found in Japanese jiu jitsu as a way to make jiu jitsu more accessible as an art and sport.

As the art became more and more focused on sport, it has evolved into the art we see today in the olympics, and removed from the heavy ground and submissions of its past.

As a former judoka as a child, and a BJJ practitioner today, I still love judo in all its forms.

But I still love the old school stuff of every art.
...

A great mindset to always have. When you practice your martial art, don’t be afraid to try and do new things, experiment with different strategies or techniques you never use.

If you never fail at something, you are never really learning, you are never really growing and you aren’t really training.

I always love to play with new ideas and techniques in sparring. Because sparring is just training, it isn’t a real fight or competition.

Sometimes it not only playing with different ideas or techniques, it is also sparring with people that you know you may lose/tap too.

In martial arts, as a practitioner, part of our goal in training is to overcome our fears, learn about our weaknesses, and become aware of our limitations. If you never do this, you have not committed to your training.

Musashi said, “The way is in training.” Seek the way.

Keep learning, keep training, keep growing.

Sifu ChuckEveryone likes to win, however, playing your best game every time leads quickly to stagnation. Except in specific circumstances, practices are not real fights, nor are they competitions.

If you aren't getting tapped out regularly then you aren't learning. If you're new to jiujitsu then you'll be tapping no matter what. As your skill improves and you climb the ranks, you'll need to change your training strategy.

Start from your worst positions. Don't begin your defense until the submission is nearly in. Try new things. Get on the mats even when you're not 100%.

Never let ego undermine your progress.

What are your thoughts?

#oldschooljiujitsu #osjjtrainingtips #tappingout
...

Bang on.

It is understandable that there will be times that we won’t be 100%. But never make excuses for your performance.

Every time you make excuses, you are giving yourself a reason to NOT try and find a solution, adaptation or real reason why you are not performing well.

Sometimes it is a genuine limitation. Acknowledge it, accept it, then figure out the best way to deal/adapt to it.

At the end of the day, you should always be able to look in the mirror and honestly say to yourself, I gave it my all and did my best. Did I learn something about myself?

Keep training, keep learning, keep growing.

Sifu ChuckIf I had a dollar for every time I've heard someone tell me about how bad their cardio is just before or just after a roll then I'd be rich.

This is just one of the many excuses people use to make themselves feel better about not doing well when their egos are threatened.

Tapping out because you're tired. When you decide to spar for a round (whether it's 5 minutes or 15), you've made a commitment to your training partner and yourself. Giving up early from fatigue is pathetic and cheats them out of their training. Especially when you try to maul them unsuccessfully for a minute or two and waste your energy.

Fatigue tap-outs also teach you that giving up when things are hard is acceptable. It undermines mental toughness. It's perfectly acceptable to take a round off if you're just coming back from time off, or are relatively new. However, short of a medical emergency you need to finish that round.

Use positive self-talk, go on the defensive, and just try to survive. Whatever it takes to keep going until the end. Work on increasing your efficiency and if you're out of shape then use that as a prompt to train more.

We've all been there and it's a horrible feeling. Weak people complain about, strong people fix the problem.

#oldschooljiujitsu #oldschoolbjj #bjjtrainingtips #bjjcardio
...

Timeline PhotosIn the early days there was no real separation between jiujitsu and vale tudo. To train jiujitsu was to be ready to fight, in the street or in the ring, against anyone at any time. It was this way when I came up through the ranks.

Over time there became an unhealthy division between modern tournament jiujitsu, mixed martial arts, and self-defense. Development in any system always comes with specialization, but at what point is it necessary to step back and understand that fractured systems are damaged ones. That something once designed to be expressed in many contexts has disintegrated into isolated pockets of knowledge.

The true art of jiujitsu can be found in those techniques which require minimal or no modification whether performed for self-defense or the tournament game.

The true mindset of jiujitsu is budō. To be ready to fight or compete at any time, in any rule set, without weight classes or time limits, and if necessary to the death. It is also to live as a warrior and face every adversity in life with courage and honor. Without these ideals jiujitsu is nothing.

"Our fears don't stop death, they stop life."

-- Rickson Gracie

Pic -- Rickson Gracie and Zulu

#oldschooljiujitsu #oldschoolbjj #ricksongracie
...

From Sifu Chuck’s Martial Arts FaceBook Page:

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Error: Error validating access token: The user has not authorized application 1332798716823516.
Type: OAuthException

Old school Judo.

The history of judo is found in Japanese jiu jitsu as a way to make jiu jitsu more accessible as an art and sport.

As the art became more and more focused on sport, it has evolved into the art we see today in the olympics, and removed from the heavy ground and submissions of its past.

As a former judoka as a child, and a BJJ practitioner today, I still love judo in all its forms.

But I still love the old school stuff of every art.
...

A great mindset to always have. When you practice your martial art, don’t be afraid to try and do new things, experiment with different strategies or techniques you never use.

If you never fail at something, you are never really learning, you are never really growing and you aren’t really training.

I always love to play with new ideas and techniques in sparring. Because sparring is just training, it isn’t a real fight or competition.

Sometimes it not only playing with different ideas or techniques, it is also sparring with people that you know you may lose/tap too.

In martial arts, as a practitioner, part of our goal in training is to overcome our fears, learn about our weaknesses, and become aware of our limitations. If you never do this, you have not committed to your training.

Musashi said, “The way is in training.” Seek the way.

Keep learning, keep training, keep growing.

Sifu ChuckEveryone likes to win, however, playing your best game every time leads quickly to stagnation. Except in specific circumstances, practices are not real fights, nor are they competitions.

If you aren't getting tapped out regularly then you aren't learning. If you're new to jiujitsu then you'll be tapping no matter what. As your skill improves and you climb the ranks, you'll need to change your training strategy.

Start from your worst positions. Don't begin your defense until the submission is nearly in. Try new things. Get on the mats even when you're not 100%.

Never let ego undermine your progress.

What are your thoughts?

#oldschooljiujitsu #osjjtrainingtips #tappingout
...

Bang on.

It is understandable that there will be times that we won’t be 100%. But never make excuses for your performance.

Every time you make excuses, you are giving yourself a reason to NOT try and find a solution, adaptation or real reason why you are not performing well.

Sometimes it is a genuine limitation. Acknowledge it, accept it, then figure out the best way to deal/adapt to it.

At the end of the day, you should always be able to look in the mirror and honestly say to yourself, I gave it my all and did my best. Did I learn something about myself?

Keep training, keep learning, keep growing.

Sifu ChuckIf I had a dollar for every time I've heard someone tell me about how bad their cardio is just before or just after a roll then I'd be rich.

This is just one of the many excuses people use to make themselves feel better about not doing well when their egos are threatened.

Tapping out because you're tired. When you decide to spar for a round (whether it's 5 minutes or 15), you've made a commitment to your training partner and yourself. Giving up early from fatigue is pathetic and cheats them out of their training. Especially when you try to maul them unsuccessfully for a minute or two and waste your energy.

Fatigue tap-outs also teach you that giving up when things are hard is acceptable. It undermines mental toughness. It's perfectly acceptable to take a round off if you're just coming back from time off, or are relatively new. However, short of a medical emergency you need to finish that round.

Use positive self-talk, go on the defensive, and just try to survive. Whatever it takes to keep going until the end. Work on increasing your efficiency and if you're out of shape then use that as a prompt to train more.

We've all been there and it's a horrible feeling. Weak people complain about, strong people fix the problem.

#oldschooljiujitsu #oldschoolbjj #bjjtrainingtips #bjjcardio
...

Timeline PhotosIn the early days there was no real separation between jiujitsu and vale tudo. To train jiujitsu was to be ready to fight, in the street or in the ring, against anyone at any time. It was this way when I came up through the ranks.

Over time there became an unhealthy division between modern tournament jiujitsu, mixed martial arts, and self-defense. Development in any system always comes with specialization, but at what point is it necessary to step back and understand that fractured systems are damaged ones. That something once designed to be expressed in many contexts has disintegrated into isolated pockets of knowledge.

The true art of jiujitsu can be found in those techniques which require minimal or no modification whether performed for self-defense or the tournament game.

The true mindset of jiujitsu is budō. To be ready to fight or compete at any time, in any rule set, without weight classes or time limits, and if necessary to the death. It is also to live as a warrior and face every adversity in life with courage and honor. Without these ideals jiujitsu is nothing.

"Our fears don't stop death, they stop life."

-- Rickson Gracie

Pic -- Rickson Gracie and Zulu

#oldschooljiujitsu #oldschoolbjj #ricksongracie
...

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